Meet Jen Buchanan

Jen and Keating posing on the grass in front of the ocean at Fort Sewall in Marblehead

Jen and Keating pose by the ocean at Fort Sewall in Marblehead

Jen Buchanan, the new Volunteer Coordinator working out of the Brookline office of the Massachusetts Association for the Blind and Visually Impaired (MABVI), knows how important finding the right services and support can be for those losing their vision, because she’s been through it herself.

“When I first was losing some sight,” she says, “I didn’t know where to go.” When she learned about a local MABVI low vision support group in her hometown of Peabody, she decided to go. “It was really the first place I had journeyed to independently with my cane. I was early and I sat outside of the room, where I met Joanne, a member of the group. She was so welcoming and had so much experience to share that I knew I was in the right place. I absolutely love each and every one of the group members. They all have something unique to share and are eager to do so.” Continue reading

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Natick Low Vision Peer Support Group serves up food, friendship, and fun

Post by Brian Klotz, Marketing Coordinator for the Massachusetts Association for the Blind and Visually Impaired (MABVI) and Natick High School Class of ’05

A stuffed snowman wearing a winter hat sits on a table at the Natick support group meetingOnce a month, they meet at the Natick Senior Center, in an often filled-to-capacity room right next to the gift shop. They come to share stories. They come to learn about helpful tips and resources. They come to bond over their shared disability: vision loss.

On this day in late December, however, they have come for the turkey.

A catered spread of turkey, mashed potatoes, stuffing, and other seasonally-appropriate food items (Let’s not forget the pie!) sits on a long table against the window as the members of the Massachusetts Association for the Blind and Visually Impaired’s (MABVI) Low Vision Peer Support Group gather for a holiday feast.

The luncheon, a break in routine from the usual guest speakers and group discussion, has become an annual December tradition for the group.

“It’s fantastic,” says group member and co-coordinator Marge Burrows. “It gets better every year.” Continue reading

What low vision specialists can do for diabetes patients

Whether you have cataracts or glaucoma, vision loss doesn’t mean saying goodbye to your daily routine. With help from a low vision specialist, people with diabetes and vision loss can manage their health and continue to live fulfilling lives.

Diabetes can cause vascular changes in the retina, which can cause blood vessels to leak blood products, and if they leak into the center of the retina (known as the macula) it can cause blurry, distorted vision. Diabetes can also increase the risk for developing other conditions such as glaucoma and cataracts.

That’s where the low vision specialist comes in. While optometrists perform exams and check-ups, low vision specialists are key for patients who want to monitor their vision loss and find new ways to continue their daily routines.

“The comprehensive eye examination has been done by others. We’re focusing on visual function and trying to help our patients do what they need to do on a daily basis,” says Dr. Philip Silver, the low vision specialist at the Joslin Diabetes Center.

Dr. Silver, who has worked at Joslin for more than 20 years, helps people with diabetes maintain their current level of vision and adapt to whatever vision loss they experience.
“Just improving patients’ quality of life by maximizing their vision keeps me going every day,” he says.

Low vision specialists help determine if factors aside from a patient’s diagnosis could be contributing to vision loss. Some patients may be diagnosed with diabetic retinopathy or degeneration, but not discover until later that they also have cataracts and glaucoma. Cataracts can make the lens cloudy, and glaucoma can damage the optic nerve, both causing more vision loss if left untreated. Detecting other conditions early on could make the difference between a patient having 2200 vision (legal blindness) and going completely blind, Dr. Silver says.

“It’s not just focusing on one disease that a person was diagnosed with,” he adds. “There are other things that have to be ruled out too.”

Technological advancements have made controlling diabetes, and thus one’s vision levels, easier for patients. Today patients can use insulin pumps and glucose monitors to maintain normal glycemic levels and blood sugar levels.

However, low vision specialists do not only monitor the effects of diabetes on vision. They also must assess patients’ current vision levels and their goals. By learning those details, low vision specialists can direct them to the right devices and therapy options to adapt to their vision loss.

Among the most common tools are magnification glasses or handheld magnifiers. One of Dr. Silver’s patients who loves to travel has a telescope mounted in her glasses to read gate signs. She also uses bifocals so that she can read. Other patients may use large print labels on their medications or household items, as well as smartphone applications that help with reading or labeling.

Low vision specialists may also send patients to occupational therapists who may help make their houses more adaptable or help them use certain devices at home.

“We’re not going to restore your vision, unfortunately, but we are going to try to maximize the vision that you have left,” he says. “There’s so much that can be done for a patient who is either losing vision or has lost vision that they owe it to themselves to get a low vision exam.”

WATCH: An Introduction to low vision optometry