Meet Megan Briggs, MABVI Director of Vision Rehabilitation

Megan BriggsWhen Megan Briggs came to the Massachusetts Association for the Blind and Visually Impaired (MABVI) in the summer of 2015 as Director of Vision Rehabilitation, she brought with her a wealth of experience in the field. Briggs earned a B.S. in Occupational Therapy from the University of New Hampshire and a Master’s in Healthcare Administration from Worcester State University. Her work has specialized on individuals with disabilities, including vision loss and/or brain injury.

Briggs has experience working in acute inpatient rehabilitation hospitals, acute care hospitals, outpatient facilities, and nursing homes. Prior to coming to MABVI, she worked for the University of Massachusetts providing services for MassHealth contracts, including Prior Authorization, Community Case Management, and ABI/MFP waivers. Her experience in both direct service and administration made her an ideal fit for MABVI’s Director of Vision Rehabilitation role, which allows her to do both. Briggs oversees MABVI’s Occupational Therapists (OTs) in addition to providing OT services herself.

“As the Director of the program,” she says, “I enjoy ensuring compliance and quality, and this job allows me to have the freedom to make change and improve systems. As a treating OT, I like to see people increase or maintain their independence. Continue reading

Medication Management: Tips from an OT

Occupational therapist Anne Escher leans over the shoulder of a visually impaired elder during an occupational visit.

Occupational therapist Anne Escher leans over the shoulder of a visually impaired elder during a vision rehabilitation visit.

Anne Escher is an occupational therapist who teaches at Boston University Sargent College of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences. She specializes in acute care, low vision and rehabilitation.

As an occupational therapist I am always trying to help people be as independent and safe as possible with their daily activities. Each person is an individual and my clients demonstrate different levels of visual impairment as well as different daily routines they have already established. Appropriate OT interventions for medication management differ from person to person, but there are some “low-tech” ideas that could help many people. Continue reading